Children’s Story: Hannah and the Evil Lizard of Nid

When my daughter was young I was the preschool director at her school.  We had sixty wonderful students and had such good fun.  One of my students was named Hannah and she was always such a serious little girl.  Nothing to smile about.  So one day at snack break I made up this story for her.  She smiled. This became her favorite story.  I read this story many times to her and my other students when they were having a frustrating or sad day and we always ended with a smile.

The other reason I wrote this story was to help young parents with parenting their children.  A little humor can go a long way in stopping a tantrum and is so much more affirming that corporal punishment.

However more recently as I progress through this Stem Cell Transplant process to battle my bone marrow cancer, I have thought of this story in an entirely new light.  Cancer outcomes are better for those who laugh and keep a good attitude.  The Evil Lizard of Nid symbolizes my disease and a good giggle is still the savior.

I hope you enjoy, “Hannah, and the Evil Lizard of Nid.”

Hannah, and the Evil Lizard of Nid

Once upon a time in the land of King Smid, lived the evil Lizard of Nid.
King Smid would tremble and quake with fear, whenever the Lizard of Nid drew near.
The King, to the lizard, would beg and plead, but that mean old lizard just wouldn’t leave.
That lizard would holler and roar and breathe fire when bored.
He’d snort and snarl and get into a fight, he’d whine, scream and stay up all through the night.
And when that lizard would finally quiet down, he would run, stomp and trample the town.

King Smid had fits, lost his wits, he was jumping in circles pulling his hair out in bits.
His entire kingdom was running amok, all because of a lizard as big as a truck.
Help was what the king needed, for it he sincerely pleaded.

Help came and knew just what to do, help was named Hannah and she was only two.
She was brave and that was all, for she was young and not very tall.
Hannah alone marched out to save the land, for she had her own grand little plan.
The lizard saw her coming, then laughed with a sneer. “Oh, I’m so afraid of this poor little dear!”
He wobbled his knees teasing with glee; “You people are foolish you’ll never be free!”
“I’m big and I’m bad and I’m better than you, your heroine’s a child she can’t be more than two!”

He rose up on his legs until he was gigantic in size, then held his breath and widened his eyes.
For there Hannah stood with her weapon held high above her head, she knew the only thing that mean lizards really dread.
A good tickling a great tantrum cannot withstand, so she sallied forth with a feather in hand.
“I’ll use this,” she said “to make you smile. Brace yourself lizard this may take awhile.”

That lizard just stood there and stared, at that feather and those sticky fingers wiggling in mid-air.
Use it she did, Hannah used it to tickle the evil Lizard of Nid.

The tantrum in him wasn’t too very strong; Hannah didn’t have to tickle him very long.
Do you know what happened that same day?
That nasty old lizard ran far away.
To the Land of Smid he never returned a very good lesson he had just learned.
All of his screaming, snorting and stomping had come to naught, because, yes, even a lizard can be taught!
A really good giggle can make the worst of moods fade.
Towns forevermore would be safe from a severe lizard raid.
Peace in the kingdom was restored.
For the quill has always been mightier than the sword.

Then, King Smid and all the citizen’s gathered around to cheer for the child who had just freed their town.
The King officially proclaimed it, “Heroine Hannah Day!”
The people together shouted, “Hip, Hip, Hooray!”

This story of brave Hannah has been retold the world around.
It isn’t every day that a little girl and a feather can save an entire town.

Patricia Turgeon
June l997

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